• sitemap?93bl6.xml
  • sitemap?h7yfU.xml
  • sitemap?zdV3O.xml
  • sitemap?MqRI7.xml
  • sitemap?aZwex.xml
  • sitemap?L7fQb.xml
  • sitemap?30J9o.xml
  • sitemap?Zr1uv.xml
  • sitemap?z5gYo.xml
  • loading
    Software name: appdown
    Software type: Microsoft Framwork

    size: 104MB

    Lanuage:Englist

    Software instructions

      CHAPTER XX.And gained the bright snow-line at last.


      CHINESE RAZOR. CHINESE RAZOR.


      "To understand the question thoroughly, it will be necessary to bear in mind that the Oriental way of thinking is very often the exact reverse of our way. We have one idea of honor and the Japanese have another; who is right or who is wrong we will not pretend to say, as each party has its own particular views and will not readily yield to the other. Writers on Japan differ considerably in their views of Japanese points of honor, and there are disagreements on the subject among the Japanese themselves; therefore I cannot speak with absolute exactness about it. According to the old code, all persons holding office under the government were required to kill themselves in the way mentioned whenever they had committed any crime, though not till they had received an order to do so from the court. If they disobeyed the order, their families would be disinherited, and none of their descendants would be allowed to hold office ever after; consequently a regard for one's family required a cheerful submission to the custom. There was no disgrace attached to a death by hari-kari, and in former times its occurrence was almost an every-day affair. One writer says, 'The sons of all persons of quality exercise themselves in their youth, for five or six years, with a view to performing the operation, in case of need, with gracefulness and dexterity; and they take as much pains to acquire this accomplishment as youth among us to become elegant dancers or skilful horsemen; hence the profound contempt of death which they imbibe in early years.' Curious custom, isn't it, according to our notions?"

      "Soon-keong has four gates, and they were opened at a certain hour in the morning. Ward went there secretly one night, and sent fourteen of his men to each of three of the gates, while he himself went with the remaining eight men to the fourth gate. The rebels suspected nothing, and at the usual time the gates were opened. Ward's men rushed in simultaneously at the four gates, made a great noise, set fire to several buildings, killed everybody they met, and pushed on for the centre of the town. In less than ten minutes the enemy had fled, and the battle was over. Ward was in full possession of the place, and a force of the imperial army, which was waiting near by, was marched in, to make sure that the rebels would not return.BARRACOONS AT MACAO. BARRACOONS AT MACAO.

      With courage undaunted we mount toward the skies,


      A PARTY ON THE TOKAIDO. A PARTY ON THE TOKAIDO.

      KIOTO AND LAKE BIWA.

      downloads

      downloads

      This little island was in reality a prison, as its inhabitants were not allowed to go outside for any purpose, except once in three years, when a delegation of them made a journey to Yeddo to make presents to the Tycoon. They were compelled to travel the most of the way in closed norimons,[Pg 309] and thus their journey did not afford them many glimpses of the country. There is a tradition that they were required to go through the ceremony of trampling on the cross in the presence of the Tycoon, and also to intoxicate themselves, as a warning to the Japanese to shun the wicked ways of the foreigners. Whether either account be true I am unable to say; the assertion is very positively made and as positively denied, and therefore I will leave every reader, who has paid his money for the book, to make choice of the side of the story which suits him best. "The Chinese find great difficulty in pronouncing r, which they almost invariably convert into l. They have a tendency to add a vowel sound (o or e) to words ending with a consonant. Bearing these points in mind, we readily see how 'drink' becomes dlinko, and 'brown' blownee. Final d and t are awkward for them to handle, and th is to their lips an abomination of first-class dimensions. 'Child' becomes chilo, and 'cold' is transformed to colo, in pidgin English. 'That,' and other words beginning with th, generally lose the sound of h, though sometimes they retain h and drop the t before it. 'Side' is used for position, and the vocabulary contains inside, outside, bottom-side (below), and top-side (above). Chop-chop means 'fast,' 'quick,' 'immediately;' man-man means 'slowly,' 'slower,' 'gently,' in the south of China; while at Han-kow, on the Yang-tse, it means exactly the reverse. At Canton or Swatow, if you say man-man to your boatmen, they will cease rowing or will proceed very lightly; say the same thing to your boatmen at Han-kow or Ichang, and they will pull away with redoubled energy."

      downloads


      "Indeed he does! I don't like to say it, and I don't say he drinks 'too much', as they call it; but, Smith, he drinks with men who do! Oh, I admire him; only I do wish--"


      alllittle